Sometimes the billions of neurons firing in our brains help us concoct elaborate scenarios. We imagine ourselves with a dream girl or landing a dream job, an astronaut, rock star, or even an United States senator; but fantasies can turn dark. We start to believe there’s a monster under the bed or that evil forces are aligning themselves against us. All these fantasies, good and bad, stem from an evolutionary imperative. Our brains are exploring potential outcomes that might help us achieve our goals or avoid danger. But if we allow fantasy to overtake our thinking, we can miss the reality that’s right in front of us. And sometimes, reality’s not so bad.

Dr. Daniel Pierce (Perception; TNT)

The most interesting heroes have a bit of villainy to them, and the most interesting villains have a certain bit of heroism in them… I think [Alan Shore] intends to do the right thing, but his view of the world is very different so, to get to the right place, he sometimes takes a path that goes through a very dark forest.

~James Spader (on his character in the legal drama Boston Legal)

It’s very hard when someone doesn’t want to change, or if they want to change and their will is weak. But I regret that I wasn’t stronger, and in a way I do feel a little bit of guilt for letting him slip through my fingers. But there were times when I did try and there were times when I was effective. Times when he did listen to me. I feel good about the occasions when I was able to help and bad about the occasions when I slipped up.

Dan Aykroyd on feeling guilty about Belushi’s death (via fydanaykroyd)

I wached loads of silent films and tried to keep as many things in my head as I could. I watched every type of silent film. From Murnau or King Vidor to Charlie Chaplin but I must say the most important film stars who influenced me in my work were Douglas Fairbanks and Gene Kelly. Ther work is fluent in my brain meanwhile. I didn’t immitate someone but I tried to combine as much as I could: The moustache is from Clark Gable, the movements are from Vittorio Grassman and the smile - well - the smile is from Gene Kelly. What you see on screen is totally me of course. 
- Jean Dujardin (Translated from a German Interview by me)

I wached loads of silent films and tried to keep as many things in my head as I could. I watched every type of silent film. From Murnau or King Vidor to Charlie Chaplin but I must say the most important film stars who influenced me in my work were Douglas Fairbanks and Gene Kelly. Ther work is fluent in my brain meanwhile. I didn’t immitate someone but I tried to combine as much as I could: The moustache is from Clark Gable, the movements are from Vittorio Grassman and the smile - well - the smile is from Gene Kelly. What you see on screen is totally me of course.

- Jean Dujardin (Translated from a German Interview by me)

Your show is so beloved by so many millions and millions of people.
When you talk to fans of the show it’s not just an episode the enjoyed. They know every detail, they know every moment, they have their favourite, they argue over which are their favourite, because YOU have created a world.

Nina Tassler talking to the Cast & Crew of NCIS ( 200th episode celebration on set )

Steve Jobs was a great friend as well as a trusted advisor. His legacy will extend far beyond the products he created or the businesses he built. It will be the millions of people he inspired, the lives he changed, and the culture he defined. Steve was such an “original,” with a thoroughly creative, imaginative mind that defined an era. Despite all he accomplished, it feels like he was just getting started. With his passing the world has lost a rare original, Disney has lost a member of our family, and I have lost a great friend. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife Laurene and his children during this difficult time.

Bob Iger, Walt Disney Company President & CEO (via kingdomcomforts)